Monday, September 22, 2014

China´s rich focus on health - Rupert Hoogewerf

Rupert Hoogewerf
Rupert Hoogewerf
Where are China´s rich spending their money? Health care proves to be one of the major winners, show the annual Hurun rich report. Pressure on the rich is mounting, says Hurun founder Rupert Hoogewerf at CCTV, and so is their need for health care.

CCTV:
As the moneyed-class expands rapidly in Chinese society, their ways of making and spending wealth have become a source of fascination for many. According to a recent survey, more and more affluent Chinese are investing big on their health. 
If you want to know how the rich live in China, Rupert Hoogewerf is the man to talk to. Starting from listing the richest people in this country, he has been researching how they snowball their wealth and give out their money for 15 years. According to his recent research, health has become an important area of investment for high-net-worth individuals. "They are under a lot of pressure at work, they are traveling one third or even half of time every month, which is an awful lot. They take very little holidays - only take seven days holidays a year, which if you take out the weekends that they work, it is probably negative. They have very little spare time. There have been two or three very famous entrepreneurs who died suddenly in their 40s. And all these have contributed making people feel overall dissatisfied with their health," he said. 
According to the Hurun Report, over 80 percent of China’s wealthy have a medical checkup annually, and 14 percent of them have one every six months. An ordinary medical checkup usually cost no more than 3,000 yuan in public hospitals, but it can be as much as 20,000 yuan in high-end hospitals.
More at CCTV.

Rupert Hoogewerf is a speaker at the China Speakers Bureau. Do you need him at your meeting or conference? Do get in touch or fill in our speakers´ request form.

Are you interested in more experts on luxury goods at the China Speakers Bureau. Do check our latest list. 

Technology moves away from the geeks to the masses - Kaiser Kuo

Kaiser Kuo
+Kaiser Kuo 
Disruptive new technologies of the coming decade will not focus on a small number of geeks, but on the billions of users, Baidu´s director of international communication Kaiser Kuo, according to the Holmes Report. "And PR people are not prepared for that change."

The Holmes Report:
Kaiser Kuo, director of international communications, for Chinese internet giant Baidu and Dan Wong, vice president of Samsung’s media solutions center, discussed some the new technologies in development by their companies and others at an In2 Summit session on Tomorrow’s Tech moderated by Zaheer Nooruddin, vice president of Waggener Edstrom’s Studio D digital and social media unit in Asia, who suggested that “technology is empowering interactions with our key audiences.” 
Kuo suggested that many of the most interesting developments of the next decade will not be new gadgets for tech-savvy consumers in the west, but products “for the next billion. Things like speech and visual recognition don’t require high levels of tech literacy but they will have a huge impact on how we communicate.” 
And, he suggested, PR people may not be ready for the changes that are about to occur. “As an industry we are way behind. We are not ready for this. We don’t have industry standards; we don’t have a strategy.”
More in the Holmes Report. Kaiser Kuo is a speaker at the China Speakers Bureau. Do you need him at your meeting or conference? Do get in touch or fill in our speakers´request form.

Are you interested in more experts on the internet at the China Speakers Bureau? Do check our latest list. 

Moving away from copycat China - Shaun Rein

Shaun Rein
+Shaun Rein 
Author Shaun Rein of the upcoming book The End of Copycat China: The Rise of Creativity, Innovation, and Individualism in Asia discusses at the Business News Network how China has moved in ten years time from a copycat economy to real innovation. Low-hanging fruit has gone, and margins are squeezed, forcing Chinese entrepreneurs to focus more on that innovation.

Alibaba Shaun Rein considers to be one of the greatest companies, by acting as a clearing house between buyers and sellers, it outsources much of the risk conventional companies still hold.

The main revolution he sees in retail, first in fast changing China, but also later at the US and Canada. Also VC firms, who used to be interested only in funding Chinese companies who looked like American ones, are now much more willing to invest in innovation too, he says.

More at the Business News Network. Shaun Rein is a speaker at the China Speakers Bureau. Do you need him at your meeting or conference? Do get in touch or fill in our speakers´ request form.

Are you interested in more experts in innovation at the China Speakers Bureau? Do check our latest list.

How Alibaba changed the VIE-discussion - Paul Gillis

Paul Gillis
+Paul Gillis
One of the major concerns for US investors looking at Chinese companies were the so-called VIE-structures, moving the company to non-Chinese jurisdictions. The major success of Alibaba´s IPO has wiped away those concerns, says accounting professor Paul Gillis, and we might see a more subtle change, he writes on his weblog.

Paul Gillis:
Alibaba’s record IPO overcame concerns about Chinese stocks. Investors had been badly burned by Chinese stocks in the past few years, but they were en-thusiastic about Alibaba. There was considerable discussion of the risks of Chin-ese stocks, and in particular the variable interest entity (VIE) structure used by Alibaba and many other overseas listed Chinese stocks. These risks remain, al-though Alibaba’s offering might have changed the picture. 
At the top of the list of concerns about Alibaba was the variable interest entity structure. I just searched Google news for variable interest entity and found 881 results. When I first wrote about VIEs in March 2011 nobody was talking about VIEs. It seems difficult to find anyone who is not aware of the structure today. The Alibaba IPO called considerable attention to the structure, including a report from a congressional commission and a letter from Senator Casey to the SEC.  Certainly Chinese officials heard an earful about VIEs. I think all this attention may help to bring a resolution to the VIE situation.  I believe that the chance of Chinese regulators banning the VIE structure has fal-len below remote. Instead, I expect they will eventually move to modify for-eign investment rules to make the VIE structure obsolete. Changing the foreign in-vestment rules to allow direct foreign investment in Chinese companies in e-commerce could allow companies like Alibaba to get rid of both their VIE and their Cayman Island structures, to the great benefit of shareholders. 
I expect that China may want to ensure that internet companies remain under the control of Chinese citizens, and Alibaba control structure that keeps Jack Ma in charge may be exactly what the doctor ordered. Allowing companies like Alibaba to directly list abroad without Cayman Island companies and VIEs might also allow Alibaba to seek a secondary stock listing on the Chinese stock ex-changes. Because of China’s strict exchange controls, most Chinese investors could not participate in the IPO of Alibaba.
More at the ChinaAccountingBlog.

Paul Gillis is a speaker at the China Speakers Bureau. Do you need him at your meeting or conference? Do get in touch or fill in our speakers´ request form.

Are you interested in more financial experts at the China Speakers Bureau? Do check out our recent list. 

Friday, September 19, 2014

The different perceptions of the Obama´s - Mark Obama Ndesandjo

Mark Obama Ndesandjo
Mark Obama Ndesandjo
Shenzhen-based Mark Obama Ndesandjo, half-brother of US president Barack Obama, discusses in his book An Obama's Journey: My Odyssey of Self-Discovery across Three Cultures their different perspectives of the Obama´s, his family and the relation with this half-brother. "Follow your own path is most important," he tells in BroadSide.

Mark Obama Ndesandjo is a speaker at the China Speakers Bureau. Do you need him at your meeting or conference? Do get in touch or fill in our speakers´request form.

  

Why Alibaba is not yet a global player - Shaun Rein

Shaun Rein at the WSJ
Shaun Rein at WSJ
Despite its close to US$22 billion IPO at the New York Stock Exchange today, business analyst Shaun Rein does not see in Alibaba a real global company. "Its model is not scalable in other large market like the US and Indonesia", he says at has much work to do at home, especially on mobile where it is lagging.

Shaun Rein is a speaker at the China Speakers Bureau. Do you need him at your meeting or conference? Do get in touch or fill in our speakers´ request form.

Are you interested in other internet experts at the China Speakers Bureau? Do check out our recently updated list.

Diamond sales rise, despite anti-corruption drive - Wei Gu

Wei Gu
+Wei Gu
Diamond sales in China have gone up 14% last year, while all other luxury goods suffered from the ongoing anti-corruption campaign. WSJ´s Wei Gu analyzes with De Beers CEO Stephen Lussier, why diamonds keep on doing so well.

Wei Gu is a speaker at the China Speakers Bureau. Do you need her at your meeting or conference? Do get in touch or fill in our speakers´ request form.

Are you interested in more luxury good experts at the China Speakers Bureau? Do check out recent list.

Thursday, September 18, 2014

Progress for women, Li Yinhe and Ian Johnson

Ian Johnson
+Ian Johnson 
Journalist Ian Johnson interviewed sexologist Li Yinhe for the New York Review of Books on her work on same-sex marriages, the Party, SM, orgies and the position of women in China. Li Yinhe believes the position of women has greatly improved since 1949. Here a short clip.

The New York Review of Books:
What about women’s rights under the Communist Party? Has progress been illusory? 
It’s definitely better than it was before 1949. It started in the 1950s, when all people—male or female—were asked to participate in the workforce. In the past it was “outward affairs handled by men, household affairs handled by women.” But this change—work—changed things for women in the cities and in the countryside. 
Even in the countryside? Haven’t women always labored there? 
Not always. In the north of China, women very often didn’t do agricultural work. They stayed at home, gave birth to children, and looked after the house. But starting in the 1950s they had to work. That helped their status immensely. They had their own income and didn’t have to rely on men. Now, in rural areas, women accounted for a third of a household’s income. This is quite different than not earning anything. In the cities, in the Fifties, Sixties, and Seventies, women’s income reached 85 percent of men’s. This was amazing. It was really high by international standards. In the US around that time, it was just 60 percent.
But you don’t think that overall the status of women in China has declined since the economic reforms of the 1980s? 
There have been some losses but it’s not uniform. Women’s income has slid from 85 percent to 70 percent of men’s. Also, there are more women not working and a lot of companies don’t want women with children, and if women get pregnant they lose their jobs. But it’s not all negative. In the 1980s, for example, the ratio of women to men at university was one to three. Now it’s 51 percent women. In fact, some universities have had to reduce admission standards for men to maintain some sort of equality—because women study harder than men! If you look at the situation of women entrepreneurs, there’s been a big improvement. Some reports say that many of the world’s top self-made female entrepreneurs are Chinese. In the past, managers were all men. 
Besides blogging, you’re still writing a lot. What are you working on now? 
I’ve written two short story collections about S&M. 
Like 50 Shades of Grey? 
It’s something like that. But I’m hesitant to try to publish them. 
But I’m sure they would sell well. 
Right now they would be banned. S&M isn’t acceptable. But I predict that in a few years it’ll be allowed.

Li Yinhe by Ian Johnson
More in the New York Review of Books.

Ian Johnson is a speaker at the China Speakers Bureau. Do you need him at your meeting or conference? Do get in touch or fill in our speakers´ request form.

The China Speakers Bureau has also a wide range of female speakers. Are you interested? Do check out our recent list.