Friday, April 18, 2014

Super-rich earn fortunes in China´s car-industry - Rupert Hoogewerf

Rupert Hoogewerf
Rupert Hoogewerf
China´s billionaires not only spend a huge part of their money on luxury cars, they also make it from the car-industry, says Rupert Hoogewerf, founder of the Hurun Rich list in the China Daily.25 Percent of the super-rich in the automotive industry come from China.

The China Daily:
A quarter of top car-industry billionaires call China home, a list from Shanghai-based Hurun magazine that documents the life of the wealthy, showed.
This year's Richest People from the Car Industry list named 45 billionaires from 13 countries. Their average fortune was $3.75 billion. Among them, 11 are from China.
Wei Jianjun, 50, chairman of the Hebei-based Great Wall Motors Co Ltd, is the richest self-made car entrepreneur in China. He ranked fifth with $7.7 billion. His company is China's largest private car brand and the biggest domestic manufacturer of SUVs and pickups.
Great Wall's market capitalization is more than $16.7 billion and annual production capacity is 800,000 vehicles. Total sales revenue was 56.8 billion yuan ($9.19 billion) in 2013 and net profit 8.3 billion yuan.
"It is no longer a secret that Chinese billionaires are huge buyers of luxury cars," Rupert Hoogewerf, chairman and chief researcher of Hurun Report, said. "But still it is quite a surprise for us to find out that Chinese are not only major buyers but also major profit-makers."
Most of China's leading automobile companies are State-owned, making it difficult to calculate personal wealth, he said.
More in the China Daily.

Rupert Hoogewerf or Hurun is a speaker at the China Speakers Bureau. Do you need him at your meeting or conference? Do get in touch or fill in our speakers´request form.

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Thursday, April 17, 2014

Alibaba: great numbers, despite growing competition - Shaun Rein

Shaun Rein
+Shaun Rein 
Alibaba´s IPO is nearing, and their latest figures are great, tells business analyst Shaun Rein at Bloomberg TV, boosting even Yahoo´s results. But competition in China by Tencent is growing, making Alibaba not the only player in the country´s e-commerce.

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Strong economy, no stimulus needed now - Shaun Rein


Shaun ReinAgainst many predictions, China´s economy is doing relatively well and business analyst Shaun Rein does not see the need for a stimulus to fire up growth now, he tells CNBC.

Shaun Rein:
The key is that a lot of analysts have said that the Chinese economy was in a downturn and there were fears like Lehman (like crisis). That is not going to happen anytime soon. The Q1 of GDP growth at 7.4 percent leading almost all of the expectations from Wall Street and the key areas, that is, wage growth and employment number continue to remain very strong. The government is going to get nervous if people are getting unemployed and that is not happening and consumer confidence is up which also beats expectation. So, overall positive numbers but the economy is still in a fairly fragile phase...
I have always argued that China shouldn’t and wouldn’t put together a big stimulus in next one to two month period. The economy is bad but it is not that bad and as the number show today. The government has another quarter or so to try to put (in place) major economic reforms to sort of reign in monetary policy, reign in non performing loans before you are going to see any type of stimulus because the economy is still growing. We see the industrial production drop but that is a good thing because the government is trying to push the country away from heavy investment-oriented growth more towards consumer oriented growth which we saw today getting retail fell, which is good. I do not expect stimulus anytime soon in a major way.

More at CNBC. 
Shaun Rein is a speaker at the China Speakers Bureau. Do you need him at your meeting or conference? Do get in touch or fill in our speakers´request form. 
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Can China urbanize in a sustainable way? - Sara Hsu

Sara Hsu
+Sara Hsu 
China´s urbanites are expected to growth with a few hundred million over the coming yers. But can cities grow in a sustainable way, wonders urbanization expert Sara Hsu in The Diplomat. The is both room for doubt and for hope, she writes.

Sara Hsu:
The plan outline looks good, but the devil, as always, is in the details. Will the environment really be protected? Will increased urbanization lead to a larger carbon footprint for the newly urbanized residents, particularly since one goal of urbanization is to increase domestic consumption? Will local governments protect farmers’ land rights when they often have not in the past? Will there be sufficient provision of services, such as a waste and water management when these services already fall short in many regions? The promises of the plan, coupled with inability to support these same policies in many regions, gives rise to doubt over whether the urbanization plan can indeed be implemented in a sustainable way.
Further, China’s urbanization process is already underway. This has taken place in several different ways, through constructing residences on the outskirts of large cities, through building up small and medium sized cities, and through construction of new cities. Some difficulties have been encountered, in terms of attracting people to new cities and resulting in existence of “ghost towns,” or in attracting sufficient industry and employment to newly populated areas, as in Shaanxi province, where rural residents resettled in urban areas have found themselves jobless. Although the Shaanxi urbanization process has resulted in part in the creation of ecological farmland towns, it is still too soon to tell whether the impacts of urbanization will be altogether environmentally sustainable.
China faces a difficult task in increasing urbanization—essentially, some analysts view China as under-urbanized, in comparison to Western nations, while others view China as over-urbanized in its struggle to care for its vast urban population. How can these two views be compromised? Given an increase in urbanization, will the country indeed be able to implement sustainable development, as it claims it will but heretofore has been unable to achieve? Based on past performance, the likelihood of China’s urbanization process falling into the sustainable category is low, but hopes are high. We hope to be pleasantly surprised.

More in the Diplomat.

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Why Sina weibo´s valuation is too high - Shaun Rein

Shaun Rein
+Shaun Rein 
Sina´s weibo is preparing for an IPO, but business analyst Shaun Rein feels that their valuation is way too high, he tells at Bloomberg TV. Weibo is not longer the hot company it used to be, after a government crackdown and competition by WeChat.

Shaun Rein is a speaker at the China Speakers Bureau. Do you need him at your meeting or conference? Do get in touch or fill in our speakers´ request form.  

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Tuesday, April 15, 2014

China´s military industry pushes for deals - Wendell Minnick

Wendell Minnick
Wendell Minnick
China´s manufacturers of military equipment have a huge delegation at the Defense Services Asia exhibition at Kuala Lumpur, notes defense expert Wendell Minnick at the Defense News. Ten companies "pushing wares as diverse as armored vests, missiles and submarines".

Wendell Minnick:
The predominant Chinese defense companies exhibiting were China Electronics Technology Group Corp. (CETC), China National Precision Machinery Import and Export Corp. (CPMIEC), China Shipbuilding Trading Co. (CSTC), and Poly Technologies
The Chinese companies did not come without political baggage. Poly Technologies, for example, was accused of attempting to ship weapons to Zimbabwe during the 2008 election crisis there, but the South African government refused to allow the ship carrying the cargo to unload the arms. 
A total of five different UAVs were being offered, though only Poly Technologies provided a model of its multipurpose tactical reconnaissance UAV system, the ASN-209. 
The fixed-wing ASN-209 has become a common sight at Asian and Middle Eastern defense exhibitions. Developed by the Xi’an ASN Technology Group, the ASN-209 is a medium-altitude, medium-endurance aircraft with a range of 200 kilometers and a 10-hour endurance. Egypt is reportedly the only foreign country that has procured it.
More a Defense News.

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Monday, April 14, 2014

Making sense out of PBOC´s policies - Sara Hsu

Sara Hsu
+Sara Hsu 
Financial analyst Sara Hsu tries to make sense out of the long list of policy changes the central bank, the People´s Bank of China (PBOC) has announced in the past year, under the Xi-Li government. "Right now, the opaque is becoming more transparent," she writes in The Diplomat.

Sara Hsu:
While the Xi-Li administration made it clear from the outset that they were pursuing financial marketization, it was unknown one year ago exactly how PBOC policy would seek to meet this general target. Now it is somewhat more transparent; the PBOC is carrying out major reforms every four months or thereabouts, with the first major move on July 22, 2013. The reforms truly are moving in the direction of financial liberalization, yet continue to control for risk. 
Right now, the opaque is becoming more transparent; the general more specific, and one might assume that this will continue. To predict what major financial reforms may occur going forward, therefore, one must look back to the important meetings referenced in the statement above. The central government has already announced that the deposit rate ceiling will soon be lifted; according to this (very briefly established) pattern, this might take place in July, four months from now. We shall soon find out.
More in The Diplomat.

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